You-Xin Wang,Ge Zhang,Bo Song,Ming Li.[J].中华创伤杂志英文版,2019,22(6):340-344
Radial head subluxation in pediatric clinics and emergency departments in China
  
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KeyWord: Radial head subluxation Pediatric emergency Recurrence
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You-Xin Wang Department of Orthopedic Center, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, National Clinical Research Center for Child Health and Disorders, China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400014, China 
Ge Zhang Department of Orthopedic Center, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, National Clinical Research Center for Child Health and Disorders, China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400014, China 
Bo Song Department of Orthopedic Center, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, National Clinical Research Center for Child Health and Disorders, China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400014, China 
Ming Li Department of Orthopedic Center, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, National Clinical Research Center for Child Health and Disorders, China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400014, China 
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Abstract:
      Purpose: To investigate the characteristics of the onset and treatment of radial head subluxation (RHS) in pediatric clinics and emergency departments. Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 11, 404 RHS cases in 9827 children who visited pediatric clinics and emergency departments from January 2015 to December 2018. The patients who with history of trauma and fracture of the affected limb were excluded. The following factors were examined: the mechanisms of RHS, the type of manual reduction, the attending physician's clinical background (emergency surgeon, junior pediatric orthopedic surgeon or senior pediatric orthopedic surgeon), and the epidemiological features (gender, age, climate and location) of the injury. Results: The mean age of the patients was 27.93 ± 17.94 months (range 0.93-214.53 months), with a peak incidence of 10.73-44.53 months. Approximately two-thirds of RHS cases occurred in cold weather from January to March and from September to December. Females accounted for 53.81% (n = 6137) of the cases, and left injuries were predominant (56.87%, n = 6485) in all cases. Mechanisms of injury were classified as “pull” (90.57%, n = 10, 339), “fall” (1.56%, n = 178), “hit” (0.75%, n = 86) and “unknown” (7.02%, n = 801). The overall success rate of manual reduction was 99.47%, and the success rate of reduction was higher for senior pediatric orthopedic surgeons than for emergency surgeons and junior pediatric orthopedic surgeons (p < 0.05). However, there was still a recurrence rate of 12.16% in the 9827 patients. Conclusion: Younger children are predisposed to RHS, and there is a possibility of recurrence. Trained emergency doctors can handle it well, but it is essential to refer patients to specialists when manual reduction failed.
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